Category Archives: Women

Why I’m Not Watching Brittana

Photo: cartermatt

Photo: cartermatt

I’ve seen all the pictures and gifs, read a lot of the recaps and many of the editorial posts. Brittana are married. This is amazing, especially when Glee often seemed more determined to walk all over queer women instead of celebrate them. But I haven’t watched an episode, not even the Brittana cuts, and I won’t, at least not for awhile.

Brittana were the couple that completely changed my life, professional and personally, in ways I could not have anticipated as an adult. They were the first time I had seen two women kiss in public (granted, it was on TV and they are fictional characters), and the first story that reached into my soul and into my past and healed wounds I had forgotten about.

But beyond maybe season 3, Glee’s behavior towards queer women–their meta commentary, dismissal of fans by the creators, often offensive storytelling, encouragement of fans more interested in competition than actual people, and a laundry list of other unpleasant ripple effects–has been a complete turn off.

I am so happy for Brittana. I’m also a little sad this could have been their story over so many seasons instead of saved for the end. But most of all, I’m unwilling to open back up (for now) to a show that has been too careless with people’s feelings and lives.

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Reads of the Week: Rose McGowan for the Win

Take a look at this week’s Reads of the Week: Great articles about the LGBTQ community, feminism, women and anything else worth reading. This one’s a little old, but still worth the mention!


  • rose_mcgowan_a_p“Where does it say that because of a man’s sexual orientation, I don’t get to point out a character defect that some of them may have? When equal pay for women was voted down by every male Republican, there was no LGBT outcry. I wondered why that was. After all, lesbians are women — this affects them too, right?”  – Rose McGowan, Advocate

Reads of the Week: Bi-Invisibility

Take a look at this week’s Reads of the Week: Great articles about the LGBTQ community, feminism, women and anything else worth reading.


Reads of the Week: Fetishisation

Take a look at this week’s Reads of the Week: Great articles about the LGBTQ community, feminism, women and anything else worth reading.


Photo: gentside.com

Photo: gentside.com

“I don’t believe that any single fantasy is innately wrong, but my little departure into those boys’ private lives was indicative of a dangerous pattern of thought. To many people, it often seems that women in the slash community have decided that “gay sex” is always sexy, that queer is always cute, and that we can take ownership of the gay male experience by writing about it and reading each other’s writing.”

“Specifically, these men indicated that straight or bisexual women had repeatedly asked overly personal questions about their sex lives, treated them like adorable puppies instead of humans, and attempted to co-opt the gay male experience or even elevate allies over actual gay men.”

– Jezebel, “On The Fetishisation Of Gay Men By Women In The Slash Community”

Reads of the Week: LGBT YA, Outrage, Cosby

Take a look at this week’s Reads of the Week: Great articles about the LGBTQ community, feminism, women and anything else worth reading.


  • cover-huntress“In 2014, mainstream publishers published 47 LGBT YA books. This is a 59% increase from 2013, when only 29 LGBT YA books were published by mainstream publishers.” – Malinda Lo, “2014 LGBT YA By the Numbers
  • “[…W]e resolved to keep track of what people got outraged about every day of 2014. Since January, a phalanx of editors, writers, and interns has been scanning the horizons for funnels of fury[…]The rage-a-day calendar above contains the fruits of their labor: a comprehensive listing of what was outrageous and whom it outraged, for every single day of the year.” – Slate, “The Year of Outrage”
  • “Rape culture, particularly as it manifests in black America, demands that justice for sexual assault victims be positioned secondary to the reputations of  “good” black men. And in a white supremacist, capitalist patriarchy that cares little for black men, and even less for black women, “good” black men are too often the only victims we collectively exert the energy to save.” – Kirsten West Savali, “Bye, Phylicia Rashad. Your Romanticizing of Cosby—and Cosby—Is Wrong”

Book: ‘fic: Why Fanfiction is Taking Over the World’

FF1Literary professor and fanfiction aficionado, Anne Jamison has taken on the wide world of fanfiction in her comprehensive volume, fic: Why Fanfiction is Taking Over the World. Covering topics such as its history, publishing and the current (2013) scope of fanficition, this collection is fairly accessible and easy to read–largely absent of pretentious academic jargon. In other words, at the end, fanfiction still sounds like community-based pleasurable reading and writing activity it is, thanks to Jamison’s obvious appreciation for and participation in fan culture.

The largest strength of this volume, aside from the positive and intelligent light Jamison sheds on the fanficition community, is the inclusion of essays from fanfic writers themselves across multiple fandoms. This includes Big Name Fans and Authors and others from Harry Potter, Twilight, Sherlock, Supernatural, Star Trek, Buffy the Vampire Slayer and more. The voices of women–the large majority of fanficition writers–are well represented and respected. These are people in the fandom trenches telling it like it is.

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Lots of ‘L’ in LGBTQ

Photo: yourselfseries.com

I received an anonymous ask on Tumblr that goes: “You said giving a voice to the LGBTQ community but from looking at your blog you seem more like someone who cares more for the L than the rest.” This is a correct observation–there is more L on my blogs than anything else–but it is not for lack of caring about the GBTQs. Perhaps some transparency in my thought process is helpful.

‘Glee’ Breakdowns

Photo: wnyc.org

Photo: wnyc.org

Glee released its first character breakdown yesterday, announcing the new roles Glee is casting for their final shortened season 6. Big surprise, all these new characters are high schoolers, 3 of the 5 characters are male, including another gay male character. I am going to place my bets right now that role will be cast as a white gay male.

I laughed a little at the Twitter outrage when TVLine made the casting information public this morning. More males, another gay male, no queer women… Why is anyone surprised? This is Glee, and history doesn’t lie. Glee has never really cared about telling the stories of queer women. The entire series has evolved into a disappointing homage to white men.

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‘Faking It’ F***ed Up

yM5DefuAFaking It. From such tentative potential after what sounded horrible, the season finale could not possibly have ended any worse. In those final seconds–with Amy (Rita Volk) and Liam’s (Gregg Sulkin) hook up–it really became a lesbian’s worst nightmare.

Covington states in a recent interview that his heart is in the right place and he comes from the same community. First, good intentions can still result in terrible actions. Secondly, he doesn’t come from the same community, as he so vividly demonstrated with Faking It’s season finale. Queer women are exploited by men–straight and apparently gay showrunners–by using these tired lesbian sleeps with man tropes, queer baiting and double standards.

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Women on TV – A Little Ignorance

oitnbDeadline ran a piece by “special to Deadline” author David Robb about “How to Court the Female Audience.” Apparently this article culminates the wisdom Robb gathered from a conference called, ‘Produced By.’ Here is a brief breakdown of what Robb failed to learn, in the form of quotes pulled from the article and a few comments.

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